Rewind: Haiku Highlights from 2018

As 2018 comes to an end, it’s time for one last glance in the rear view mirror.

25 notebooks filled in 2018

I published 46 new poems in 2018, up from 36 in 2017, 38 in 2016, and 40 in 2015. In terms of quantity, 2018 was one of my biggest years so far. They appeared in the following journals: Acorn (1), Akitsu Quarterly (4), The Cicada’s Cry (1), The Cicada’s Cry Halloween Digital Edition (1), Failed Haiku (14), Frogpond (2), Haikuniverse (1), Haiku Windows (4), The Heron’s Nest (5), Mariposa (2), A Sense of Place (3), Wales Haiku Journal (7), and Shamrock (1).

One of my biggest milestones in 2018 was that I reached, and surpassed, 500 published poems. That’s a number I’ve been eyeing for a while.

Other notable publications my work appeared in are: old song: The Red Moon Anthology of English-Language Haiku 2017 (Red Moon Press, 2018); Echoes 2 (Red Moon Press, 2018); Four Hundred and Two Snails: Haiku Society of America Members’ Anthology 2018; The Haiku Calendar 2019 (Snapshot Press, 2018); Earthrise Rolling Haiku Collaborative (The Haiku Foundation, 2018); Per Diem: Daily Haiku (The Haiku Foundation, September 2018, theme of sport), and Charlotte Digregorio’s Writer’s Blog (April 2018).

And hey, I even managed to win a few awards. One of my poems won The Heron’s Nest Award in the June issue of The Heron’s Nest, and another in that same issue received an Editor’s Choice. And a couple other poems received runner-up awards in Snapshot Press’s Haiku Calendar Competition.

As far as the writing itself, I published some poems that could potentially end up in my next collection, tentatively titled The White Buffalo. I also published some senryu about a clown motel, a bit outside of my normal subject matter.

Looking forward to 2019, a number of publications are already in the works. Four new poems will appear right off the bat in the January issue of Failed Haiku, and I have had a poem accepted for the March issue of The Heron’s Nest. I have also had a poem voted into a hole in the light: The Red Moon Anthology of English-Language Haiku 2018 (Red Moon Press, 2019). I will have three poems republished in an anthology currently known as Small Town Poetry Anthology, edited by Tom Montag and David Graham for MWPH Books. I’m not sure when it will finally appear, but I have received galley proofs of my poems. I’m very excited to be a part of this one. And I am eagerly waiting for a reply from the editor of an anthology of haiku about trains.

All in all, 2018 was a great year for my writing. My goals are set for 2019, and I’ve already hit the ground running. Many thanks to the editors who published my work in 2018 as well as to everyone to who took the time to check out my blog or Facebook profiles.

Happy New Year!

content copyright Chad Lee Robinson.

November Haiku News

It’s been a busy couple months since my last post. I’ve written lots of new material, and have been publishing widely. The writing has focused mostly on Halloween and related themes, and it’s really been a lot of fun. Out of that I’ve written some poems that are a bit of a surprise, even to me.

In September, three new haiku appeared in Wales Haiku Journal, including this one-liner:

hands all over our summer nights blur together

And this one appeared in the Fall issue of Frogpond:

deep night sky
the dashboard lights too bright
for this loneliness

I also had a poem republished in this year’s Haiku Society of America Members’ Anthology titled Four Hundred and Two Snails.

October saw one new poem published in the Fall issue of Acorn:

night train
the slight lift of snow
in the snow globe

And the October issue of Failed Haiku featured five of my senryu, including these two Halloween-inspired ones:

fresh dirt the drag line of a zombie

 

grim
reaper
Wal-Mart
greeter

 

 

More Halloween poems appeared in Haikuniverse and a special digital Halloween edition of The Cicada’s Cry:

playing the record backwards swirling clouds

 

 

 

 

the tune
the embalmer whistles–
mixing drinks

 

 

 

 

 

 

So far in November I’ve had two haiku republished in the Snapshot Press Haiku Calendar 2019. I also published nine new senryu in the November issue of Failed Haiku. One of the nine is this Halloween one:

Halloween sack race–
the skeleton falls apart
at the finish line

 

The other eight from this batch are a bit unusual for me. While I was brainstorming ideas for more Halloween haiku, I thought about writing some about creepy clowns, and I remembered there had been reports of creepy clown sightings. So when I searched online for information about those sightings I stumbled across the phrase “clown motel”. I guess it triggered something, and I wrote a whole string of these goofy things. Here’s a couple:

clown motel–
for assistance
honk nose

clown motel–
a complimentary pie in the face
at checkout

Like I said, goofy. But what’s goofier is that I’ve written more of them!

Anyway, what’s in store for the remainder of 2018 includes one haiku in the December issue of The Heron’s Nest and four haiku in the winter issue of Akitsu Quarterly. I currently have submissions out for consideration at three publications, so fingers crossed for continued success.

Many thanks to the editors of the journals and publications mentioned above.

All poems copyright Chad Lee Robinson.

Photographs taken at the Grey Goose Halloween Display 2018. All Photographs copyright Chad Lee Robinson.

September Haiku Update

It’s hard to believe the last time I posted was in June. Where did the summer go?

I’ve been steadily writing and submitting, and have even had a number of new haiku published. Three new poems have appeared in the haiku column A Sense of Place edited by kjmunro for The Haiku Foundation. Those familiar with my haiku know that place has always been important to me, and the writing prompts for A Sense of Place have been fun to attempt. One prompt asked to explore the sense of taste at the shore, and I came up with this:

surging waves . . .
the taste
of her tan lines

The prompts are currently set in the mountains, and I wrote this for the sense of hearing:

logging trucks . . .
another mountain
loses its voice

and this, for the sense of taste:

campfire coffee
the taste of what can’t be scraped
from the kettle

Recently, I published for the first time in The Cicada’s Cry, a micro-zine of haiku published in Delaware and edited by JM Reinbold:

each fence post
a pulpit . . .
meadowlark song

I also published a new one in the September issue of The Heron’s Nest:

a collie’s bark . . .
last of the winter clouds
driven north

Issue #40 of Shamrock Haiku Journal out of Ireland just published another of mine:

a crow with more
than a thing or two to say
sour wind

And on the horizon, one haiku in the Fall issue of Frogpond, one in the Fall issue of Acorn, and four in the winter issue of Akitsu Quarterly.

Thank you to the editors of the publications above.

All poems copyright Chad Lee Robinson.

Rewind: Haiku Highlights from 2017

It’s hard to believe 2017 is over. Each year seems to go by faster than the one before. It’s harder to believe that this is the third Rewind post I’ve written.

notebooks used in 2017

2017 was another successful year for my writing. I met all my writing goals by July, and even met my extended goals. I published 36 new poems in 2017 (31 haiku and senryu, and 5 tanka) in the following places: Acorn (1), Akitsu Quarterly (3), Frogpond (2), Golden Haiku Contest (1), Gusts (3), Haiku in the Workplace (9), Haikuniverse (1), hedgerow (3), The Heron’s Nest (5), Mariposa (2), Modern Haiku (1), Shamrock (4), and Stardust (1).

A good portion of my new material appeared in Jim Kacian’s column Haiku in the Workplace, which just recently ended. While I’m sad to see the column go, I hope the new one, Haiku Windows, edited by poet kjmunro, will be as inspiring.

One of my goals every year is to publish in one venue I’ve never published in before. In 2017, I had work published in two such places, Gusts, a tanka journal, and Stardust. I submitted to a couple of other journals I’ve not previously published in, but both of those submissions were rejected in their entirety.

In February I learned, much to my surprise, that a haiku I submitted to the Golden Haiku Contest received a runner-up award. In this contest, the winners and runners-up are printed on signs and placed in flowerbeds in certain neighborhoods of Washington D.C.. Due to one reason or another I can’t recall, I don’t think all of the chosen haiku made it out to the streets. If the pics of the haiku signs on the Golden Triangle website are any indication, then it seems my haiku did not make it to a flower bed. Despite this, I am still happy to have had a haiku chosen for a contest. In April, I was honored to have a haiku shortlisted for a Touchstone Award for Individual Poems. I am most certainly grateful.

I republished work in four different anthologies in 2017. The first was in dust devils: the Red Moon Anthology of English-Language Haiku 2016 (Red Moon Press, 2017), followed by on down the road: Haiku Society of America Members’ Anthology 2017 (edited by LeRoy Gorman), then The Wonder Code: Discover the Way of Haiku and See the World with New Eyes (Girasole Press, 2017, edited by Scott Mason), and finally They Gave Us Life: Celebrating Mothers, Fathers & Others in Haiku (Middle Island Press, 2017, edited by Robert Epstein).

Looking ahead to 2018, I will have a poem published in the year’s first issue of Frogpond. I have submitted the necessary info and poems to be a part of the Echoes 2 project, which will be a sort of update on all the haiku poets who have appeared in a volume of Red Moon Press’s A New Resonance series. Last July I began work on my fourth collection of haiku which carries the working title of The White Buffalo. I’m hoping this one won’t take ten years to put together like The Deep End of the Sky did! No matter what, it will be a long process, and I’ve only just begun.

Last September, it had been 15 years since I sat in that windowless classroom at South Dakota State University where David Allan Evans (then poet laureate of SD) wrote a haiku by Basho on the eraser board. I will always be grateful to Professor Evans for including haiku in his creative writing class. I was in the right place that day.

So this New Year’s Eve, where ever you are, raise a glass with me

to fifteen more . . .

Just a few favorites from 2017:

prairie storm
the darkness disperses
as buffalo

The Heron’s Nest XIX:3, September 2017
*

straightness of the bean rows–
a simple nod
from my father

Haiku in the Workplace: A Job Well Done (The Haiku Foundation, June 2017)
*

rustle of corn leaves–
fitting my son
for a new ball glove

The Heron’s Nest XIX:4, December 2017

All poems copyright Chad Lee Robinson

Acorn and Other News

I recently received the spring issue of Acorn that includes a new poem of mine. As always, I’m thrilled to be in another issue of Acorn. It’s such a fantastic haiku journal. With thanks to Susan Antolin, here is my contribution:

it’s cancer . . .
the tips of the tall grass
brush my palms

by Chad Lee Robinson, Acorn No. 38, Spring 2017

In other news, I feel kinda bad that I wasn’t able to participate in this year’s EarthRise Rolling Haiku Collaboration for International Haiku Poetry Day, but the theme of reconciliation just didn’t spark anything for me. So hopefully next year’s theme will be more inspiring.

The Touchstone Awards for Individual Poems were announced yesterday. I was honored to have a poem on the shortlist, this one which was originally published in Mariposa 35, 2016 (thanks to editor Cherie Hunter Day):

restringing fence wire–
the meadowlark’s song one post
ahead of the wind

by Chad Lee Robinson

Unfortunately, the Touchstone judges did not select my poem as a winner. Since the Touchstone Awards began, I have been fortunate enough to have had four poems shortlisted, one of which (this one) actually won:

migrating geese–
the things we thought we needed
darken the garage

by Chad Lee Robinson, first published in The Heron’s Nest Vol. XIII, Number 1: March, 2011.

This haiku can also be found in my award-winning collection from Turtle Light Press, The Deep End of the Sky.

Thanks to the Touchstone judges for shortlisting my poem.

National Poetry Month, Publication News, and Acceptances

Today, Saturday, April 1st, kicks off National Poetry Month, 30 days dedicated to celebrating poetry. I hope you will participate at some point during the month, even if only in a small way. You can celebrate in a number of ways, such as by reading a poem a day, or by writing one, or by buying a book of poetry which you could do at your local book shop (the book could even be by a local poet), or by celebrating Poem in Your Pocket Day on April 27 when you can carry a favorite poem with you and share it with family and friends and coworkers. Head over to the website for the Academy of American Poets to read 30 ways you can celebrate National Poetry Month. But let’s not forget the most important day during National Poetry month: International Haiku Poetry Day on April 17th. Click the link to read about ways you can participate in haiku activities near you, courtesy of The Haiku Foundation.

What better way to celebrate National Poetry Month than by announcing the publication of brand new poems. I am pleased to share that I have three new tanka published in the spring/summer issue (#25) of Gusts, the official publication of Tanka Canada. This is my first appearance in Gusts. Many thanks to the editors. Here are two of those tanka:

a song from my youth . . .
on the strength
of old feelings
I bench press
a personal best

in my son’s dream
I am the monster . . .
for everyone else
the day’s darkness
is rain clouds

And if that isn’t exciting enough, I am pleased to announce that Chris Patchel, editor of Frogpond, the journal of the Haiku Society of America, recently accepted two haiku for issue 40.2, Summer 2017. Also, the spring issue of Acorn: a journal of contemporary haiku should be released in April which will include a haiku by yours truly. Many thanks to the editors of these journals.

Let’s get celebrating!

Rewind: Haiku Highlights from 2016

I’ve been having a hard time saying what I want to say about 2016. I accomplished some great things with my haiku writing, but the echo of certain failures from year to year are starting to get to me. So I will do my best to keep any negative feelings I’m holding right now out of this highlight reel and keep this as straight forward as I can.

I published 38 new poems (37 haiku and senryu, and 1 tanka) in the following places: Acorn, Akitsu Quarterly, bottle rockets, Failed Haiku, Frogpond, Haikuniverse, hedgerow, The Heron’s Nest, A Hundred Gourds, Mariposa, Otata, Sonic Boom, Under the Basho, and Upstate Dim Sum.  Six of these places I published in for the first time in 2016: Failed Haiku, Haikuniverse, hedgerow, Otata, Sonic Boom, and Upstate Dim Sum.

I republished some poems this year in the following places: galaxy of dust: The Red Moon Anthology of English-Language Haiku 2015 (Red Moon Press, 2016); naad anunaad: an anthology of contemporary world haiku (Vishwakarma Publications, 2016); Full of Moonlight: Haiku Society of America Members’ Anthology 2016 (Haiku Society of America, 2016), The Haiku Calendar 2017 (Snapshot Press, 2016); Charlotte Digregorio’s Writers’ Blog; and in two columns at The Haiku Foundation: Haiku in the Workplace and reVirals.

I did receive some awards in 2016. I had one winner and one runner-up in Snapshot Press’s Haiku Calendar Competition. It’s always an honor to be included in that one. Also I was one of the “other popular poets” in The Heron’s Nest Readers’ Choice Awards, and I had a poem in the “other popular poems” part of those same awards. And this one-liner of mine

in a rush to reach stillness whitewater

was shortlisted for a Touchstone Award for Individual Poems from The Haiku Foundation.

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000032_00006]

 

On top of that, my book The Deep End of the Sky (Turtle Light Press, 2015) received second place in the Haiku Society of America Merit Book Awards for 2016. Not too shabby.

 

 

Placing in the Merit Book Awards is definitely one I can cross off the haiku bucket list. But so is being the Route 9 Haiku Group’s guest poet in Upstate Dim Sum. When I scan the list of previous guest poets, I don’t really feel like I should be among such an outstanding group of haiku poets, but I am honored and grateful and excited to be there.

Looking forward to 2017, I have one haiku accepted for publication in Modern Haiku. And I have yet to find out if any of my work has been voted into the next Red Moon Anthology, so fingers crossed I will have work voted in.

I am grateful to (still) be writing and publishing. I appreciate every opportunity I had in 2016, and hope 2017 will bring many more haiku moments to share.

Happy New Year