A Splash of Water

A Splash of WaterToday’s mail included a copy of the Haiku Society of America’s 2015 Members’ Anthology A Splash of Water, edited by Catherine J.S. Lee. The theme for this year’s anthology is water in all its manifestations. Lots of good work, some new and some reprinted, to be found here. What I like best about the HSA member anthologies is the variety of haiku collected in each one. My contribution to A Splash of Water comes from my series of old blue car haiku. Many thanks to Catherine and to the Haiku Society of America.

old blue car
a shimmer of clouds
in the hose water

by Chad Lee Robinson, originally published in Acorn 23, 2009.

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Looking Ahead

Originally I started this post by looking back over my writing activity for 2015, but decided that that post will be better suited for the end of the year. So I’m looking ahead at what the rest of 2015 may bring.

I recently submitted new haiku to two of the best haiku journals around, and am optimistic that I will have some of that work accepted for publication. I am also currently waiting to hear back about yet another submission that’s been floating around my submissions folder for three and a half months! I typically don’t submit to publications or contests that take so long to respond as I don’t like waiting such a long time for a decision. I like quicker turnaround. If the work is good I want it published or at least accepted for publication as soon as possible. Anyway, I am hoping to hear back on that one by the end of this week. Of course, all of this is leading up to a major milestone, at least for me. The milestone won’t mean much to anyone else but me. I’ll explain what I mean when it happens.

Aside from hearing the results of recent submissions, I will have work in a couple forthcoming anthologies: Nest Feathers (from The Heron’s Nest, scheduled for release in October) and an anthology of haiku about the afterlife (edited by Robert Epstein, no release info available yet). As for journals, I have haiku forthcoming in Modern Haiku, muttering thunder, Presence, and Frozen Butterfly.  I will probably put together one or two more submissions which will go out in October and/or November. I get busy at work for the holidays, so the writing slows down. December is usually too busy to worry about submissions.

I’m also looking forward to The Haiku Foundation’s Touchstone Distinguished Book Awards. I have been on the panel of judges for two years, so this year will be my last. I am looking forward to reading many haiku books I may not otherwise get to read.

Since summer is almost at an end, I’d like to leave you with this:

old blue car—
the ease
of summer’s last days

The Heron’s Nest Volume X, Number 4: December, 2008

haiku by Chad Lee Robinson

Rows of Corn

This is the second in a four-part series exploring the seasonal sections of my forthcoming haiku collection The Deep End of the Sky.

“Rows of Corn” is the title of the summer section of The Deep End of the Sky, my forthcoming collection of haiku from Turtle Light Press. This section of the book features 11 haiku that focus on farm-related tasks and continues to explore familial relationships. A few examples:

the Big Dipper—
rows of corn connect
farm to farm

cemetery—
the scent of muskmelon
from the next hill

wind in the tall grass . . .
an old blue car
almost in motion

South Dakota’s top crops are corn, soybeans, hay, wheat, and sunflowers. Of these only corn and wheat make an appearance in “Rows of Corn”, but muskmelon and watermelons also show up as well. Besides hay (bales), my favorite of South Dakota’s crops is the sunflower. Even though there are sunflower fields all around Pierre, I have yet to write a haiku about them that is as good as the haiku in The Deep End of the Sky. Oh well, maybe I’ll get one written for my next collection.

If you enjoy these haiku, and the ones from my post “The Tractor’s Radio”, then you should think about getting a copy of my book The Deep End of the Sky. It’s available to pre-order from Turtle Light Press for $12.50 with free shipping in the US.