Rewind: Haiku Highlights from 2018

As 2018 comes to an end, it’s time for one last glance in the rear view mirror.

25 notebooks filled in 2018

I published 46 new poems in 2018, up from 36 in 2017, 38 in 2016, and 40 in 2015. In terms of quantity, 2018 was one of my biggest years so far. They appeared in the following journals: Acorn (1), Akitsu Quarterly (4), The Cicada’s Cry (1), The Cicada’s Cry Halloween Digital Edition (1), Failed Haiku (14), Frogpond (2), Haikuniverse (1), Haiku Windows (4), The Heron’s Nest (5), Mariposa (2), A Sense of Place (3), Wales Haiku Journal (7), and Shamrock (1).

One of my biggest milestones in 2018 was that I reached, and surpassed, 500 published poems. That’s a number I’ve been eyeing for a while.

Other notable publications my work appeared in are: old song: The Red Moon Anthology of English-Language Haiku 2017 (Red Moon Press, 2018); Echoes 2 (Red Moon Press, 2018); Four Hundred and Two Snails: Haiku Society of America Members’ Anthology 2018; The Haiku Calendar 2019 (Snapshot Press, 2018); Earthrise Rolling Haiku Collaborative (The Haiku Foundation, 2018); Per Diem: Daily Haiku (The Haiku Foundation, September 2018, theme of sport), and Charlotte Digregorio’s Writer’s Blog (April 2018).

And hey, I even managed to win a few awards. One of my poems won The Heron’s Nest Award in the June issue of The Heron’s Nest, and another in that same issue received an Editor’s Choice. And a couple other poems received runner-up awards in Snapshot Press’s Haiku Calendar Competition.

As far as the writing itself, I published some poems that could potentially end up in my next collection, tentatively titled The White Buffalo. I also published some senryu about a clown motel, a bit outside of my normal subject matter.

Looking forward to 2019, a number of publications are already in the works. Four new poems will appear right off the bat in the January issue of Failed Haiku, and I have had a poem accepted for the March issue of The Heron’s Nest. I have also had a poem voted into a hole in the light: The Red Moon Anthology of English-Language Haiku 2018 (Red Moon Press, 2019). I will have three poems republished in an anthology currently known as Small Town Poetry Anthology, edited by Tom Montag and David Graham for MWPH Books. I’m not sure when it will finally appear, but I have received galley proofs of my poems. I’m very excited to be a part of this one. And I am eagerly waiting for a reply from the editor of an anthology of haiku about trains.

All in all, 2018 was a great year for my writing. My goals are set for 2019, and I’ve already hit the ground running. Many thanks to the editors who published my work in 2018 as well as to everyone to who took the time to check out my blog or Facebook profiles.

Happy New Year!

content copyright Chad Lee Robinson.

November Haiku News

It’s been a busy couple months since my last post. I’ve written lots of new material, and have been publishing widely. The writing has focused mostly on Halloween and related themes, and it’s really been a lot of fun. Out of that I’ve written some poems that are a bit of a surprise, even to me.

In September, three new haiku appeared in Wales Haiku Journal, including this one-liner:

hands all over our summer nights blur together

And this one appeared in the Fall issue of Frogpond:

deep night sky
the dashboard lights too bright
for this loneliness

I also had a poem republished in this year’s Haiku Society of America Members’ Anthology titled Four Hundred and Two Snails.

October saw one new poem published in the Fall issue of Acorn:

night train
the slight lift of snow
in the snow globe

And the October issue of Failed Haiku featured five of my senryu, including these two Halloween-inspired ones:

fresh dirt the drag line of a zombie

 

grim
reaper
Wal-Mart
greeter

 

 

More Halloween poems appeared in Haikuniverse and a special digital Halloween edition of The Cicada’s Cry:

playing the record backwards swirling clouds

 

 

 

 

the tune
the embalmer whistles–
mixing drinks

 

 

 

 

 

 

So far in November I’ve had two haiku republished in the Snapshot Press Haiku Calendar 2019. I also published nine new senryu in the November issue of Failed Haiku. One of the nine is this Halloween one:

Halloween sack race–
the skeleton falls apart
at the finish line

 

The other eight from this batch are a bit unusual for me. While I was brainstorming ideas for more Halloween haiku, I thought about writing some about creepy clowns, and I remembered there had been reports of creepy clown sightings. So when I searched online for information about those sightings I stumbled across the phrase “clown motel”. I guess it triggered something, and I wrote a whole string of these goofy things. Here’s a couple:

clown motel–
for assistance
honk nose

clown motel–
a complimentary pie in the face
at checkout

Like I said, goofy. But what’s goofier is that I’ve written more of them!

Anyway, what’s in store for the remainder of 2018 includes one haiku in the December issue of The Heron’s Nest and four haiku in the winter issue of Akitsu Quarterly. I currently have submissions out for consideration at three publications, so fingers crossed for continued success.

Many thanks to the editors of the journals and publications mentioned above.

All poems copyright Chad Lee Robinson.

Photographs taken at the Grey Goose Halloween Display 2018. All Photographs copyright Chad Lee Robinson.

Haiku News for March

Today marks the beginning of National Poetry Month. I hope at some point in April you enjoy a little poetry, be it haiku or otherwise. If it’s haiku you want, I got you covered.

March didn’t seem like a very active month for me, but looking at my list of things to mention, I didn’t do too bad at all. The month began with the publication of a haiku in The Heron’s Nest:

heat ripples . . .
the horse’s tongue scrapes
bottom

Publication of a one-liner followed in Frogpond:

taking me down a gravel road the blues man’s voice

From there I got two haiku accepted for publication in Mariposa #38, and two more accepted for publication in the June issue of The Heron’s Nest.

And yesterday, Snapshot Press released the results of The Haiku Calendar Competition 2018, and two of my previously published haiku received runner-up awards, and they will appear in the Haiku Calendar 2019. It is always a pleasure to be included in something from Snapshot Press. The content is always high quality, as is the production.

Many thanks to the editors of all the publications mentioned above.

The Haiku Calendar 2017

the-haiku-calendar-2017The Haiku Calendar 2017 is now available from Snapshot Press. I am pleased to have two haiku in it, one winner for the month of May, and one runner-up for the month of April. Both of my haiku can also be found in my award-winning collection The Deep End of the Sky. According to Snapshot Press’s website, “The Haiku Calendar has appeared annually since the 2000 edition was published in 1999. Edited by John Barlow, and featuring haiku poets from around the world, the calendar continues a rich tradition exploring and celebrating the relevance of seasonal references in English-language haiku.” Many thanks to John Barlow for choosing my work for such a beautiful publication.

the-haiku-calendar-2017-winner

Winning haiku for the month of May, The Haiku Calendar 2017 (Snapshot Press)

the-haiku-calendar-2017-runner-up

Runner-up haiku for the month of April, The Haiku Calendar 2017 (Snapshot Press)

 

Frogpond and More

I am delighted to announce that I will have a haiku in the next issue of Frogpond 39:3, with thanks to interim editor Christopher Patchel and interim co-editor Joyce Clement.

Here are the places to watch for my work over the next couple months: Frogpond, Mariposa, The Heron’s Nest, the Haiku Society of America’s members’ anthology, and The Haiku Calendar 2017 from Snapshot Press.

More haiku news coming soon!

The Haiku Calendar Competition 2016

Snapshot Press has announced the results of The Haiku Calendar Competition 2016, and I am pleased to report that one of my haiku is the winner for the month of May, and another one of my haiku is a Runner-up for the month of April. To read the full list of winners and runners-up, go here.

The contest received a whopping 1,115 entries, and with only 52 spots to fill The Haiku Calendar 2017, this made for some stiff competition. The quality of the haiku that appear in any edition of The Haiku Calendar is quite high. So high, in fact, that I usually only submit every other year because it takes me that long to write a submission’s worth of material of that caliber.

Many thanks to John Barlow for selecting my work for The Haiku Calendar 2017.

Here is my winning haiku for the month of May:

meadowlark–

all you’ll ever need to know

about sunrise

The Deep End of the Sky

My blog’s title comes from the name of my forthcoming book The Deep End of the Sky. It’s a collection of haiku I’ve been working with off and on for quite a few years (at least seven). Every time I thought I might have enough good haiku for a collection, I’d sort through my work to try and piece something together, but I never had enough good ones to go in the direction I wanted. So I kept writing and publishing, and once in a while I’d sort through my work again to see if I could put something together. In 2011 I put together a little collection called Rope Marks that Snapshot Press published in 2012 as part of its eChapbook lineup. That’s when I knew I was getting close, that’s when I knew what I wanted was a book of haiku that has a sense of place. And for me that place is South Dakota. So in late 2013, early 2014 I put together the manuscript for The Deep End of the Sky, and sent it to the Turtle Light Press chapbook competition.

It was early October, and I was sitting at the kitchen table eating lunch when my cellphone rang. The voice on the other end was Rick Black of Turtle Light Press, letting me know that the contest judge, Penny Harter, chose The Deep End of the Sky as winner. Her commentary is outstanding. I won’t tell you what Penny said though. I’ll let you read it for yourself here: http://www.turtlelightpress.com/2014-tlp-haiku-chapbook-winner/

And if your interested in buying a copy for yourself or as a gift, you can pre-order it here: http://www.turtlelightpress.com/products/deep-end-sky/

I’ve got lots more to say about the book, so stay tuned . . .