tapping trail dust

A haiku of mine is featured today on Charlotte Digregorio’s Writer’s Blog. She regularly features haiku by some of the genre’s most outstanding poets. I am grateful to Charlotte for showcasing one of mine.

tapping trail dust
from the harmonica . . .
twilight stars

by Chad Lee Robinson

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Rows of Corn

This is the second in a four-part series exploring the seasonal sections of my forthcoming haiku collection The Deep End of the Sky.

“Rows of Corn” is the title of the summer section of The Deep End of the Sky, my forthcoming collection of haiku from Turtle Light Press. This section of the book features 11 haiku that focus on farm-related tasks and continues to explore familial relationships. A few examples:

the Big Dipper—
rows of corn connect
farm to farm

cemetery—
the scent of muskmelon
from the next hill

wind in the tall grass . . .
an old blue car
almost in motion

South Dakota’s top crops are corn, soybeans, hay, wheat, and sunflowers. Of these only corn and wheat make an appearance in “Rows of Corn”, but muskmelon and watermelons also show up as well. Besides hay (bales), my favorite of South Dakota’s crops is the sunflower. Even though there are sunflower fields all around Pierre, I have yet to write a haiku about them that is as good as the haiku in The Deep End of the Sky. Oh well, maybe I’ll get one written for my next collection.

If you enjoy these haiku, and the ones from my post “The Tractor’s Radio”, then you should think about getting a copy of my book The Deep End of the Sky. It’s available to pre-order from Turtle Light Press for $12.50 with free shipping in the US.

The Tractor’s Radio

This is the first in a four-part series exploring the seasonal sections of my forthcoming haiku collection The Deep End of the Sky.

“The Tractor’s Radio” is the title of the spring section of The Deep End of the Sky, my forthcoming collection of haiku from Turtle Light Press. This section of the book features 11 haiku beginning with these two:

at
the
deep
end
of
the
sky
prairie

meadowlark—
all you’ll ever need to know
about sunrise

And here is this section’s title haiku:

stars at dusk:
the tractor’s radio
crackles

My family has deep roots in South Dakota. So, while many haiku in The Deep End of the Sky depict the farm landscape of America’s heartland, others are more personal, touching on aging and the loss of loved ones, such as this one, also in the spring section:

spring rain—
speaking of the dead
in a softer voice

Here’s one more with South Dakota’s state flower:

petals thinner
than their purple
pasque at first light

The Deep End of the Sky is available to pre-order from Turtle Light Press’s store for $12.50 with free shipping in the U.S.